Eastern Bloc

eastern bloc

The Eastern Bloc, also known as the Communist Bloc and the Soviet Bloc, was the group of socialist states of Central and Eastern Europe, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America under the influence of the Soviet Union that existed during the Cold War (1947–1991). These states followed the ideology of Marxism–Leninism, in opposition to the capitalist Western Bloc. The Eastern Bloc was often called the Second World, whereas the term “First World” referred to the Western Bloc and “Third World” referred to the non-aligned countries that were mainly in Africa, Asia, and Latin America but notably also included former pre-1948 Soviet ally SFR Yugoslavia, which was located in Europe.

In Western Europe, the term Eastern Bloc generally referred to the USSR and Central and Eastern European countries in the Comecon (East Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, and Albania[a]). In Asia, the Soviet Bloc comprised Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, Kampuchea, North Korea and China.[b][1][2][3][4][5] In the Americas the countries aligned with the Soviet Union included Cuba since 1961 and for limited periods Nicaragua and Grenada.

1860 united states presidential election
American Civil War

1860 United States presidential election

The election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1860 was the final trigger for secession.[109] Southern leaders feared that Lincoln would stop the expansion of slavery

outbreak of the war
American Civil War

Outbreak of the war

The election of Lincoln provoked the legislature of South Carolina to call a state convention to consider secession. Before the war, South Carolina did more

battle of fort sumter
American Civil War

Battle of Fort Sumter

Table of Contents The disagreement between the two states over tariffs quickly escalated into the American Civil War. On April 12th, 1861, Confederate forces bombarded

border states
American Civil War

Border States

Table of Contents “Border States” refers to the slave states that surrounded the free states that made up the Union. When it came to winning

economic history of the american civil war
American Civil War

Economic History of the American Civil War

The economic history of the American Civil War concerns the financing of the Union and Confederate war efforts from 1861 to 1865, and the economic

american civil war prison camps
American Civil War

American Civil War Prison Camps

Between 1861 and 1865, American Civil War prison camps were operated by the Union and the Confederacy to detain over 400,000 captured soldiers. From the